Sequoia Audubon Society
San Mateo County, California

Meeting Programs

February 14, 2019
Why We LOVE Sequoia Audubon: Our History, Accomplishments, and Future
Speaker: Jennifer Rycenga

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Be My Valentine, says the lonely Sora! (Jennifer Rycenga, photographer)
Be My Valentine, says the lonely Sora! (Jennifer Rycenga, photographer)

For our seventieth anniversary, we will launch a history project to record, in pamphlet form, our accomplishments and adventures as one of the best little Audubon chapters in the country. In this presentation, Jennifer Rycenga will survey what we know from our archives, from stories, from bird data, and from our conservation record. She will also elicit tidbits of personal Sequoia Audubon history from any members present and willing. Valentine’s Day cheer, chocolate, and romance will also be invoked!

March 14, 2019
Species Worth Watching: Bird Conservation in San Mateo County
Conservation Roundtable led by Sequoia’s Conservation Committee chair, Marshall Dinowitz, with Kent Forward and Jane Kim

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Ashy Storm-Petrel is one of the most range-restricted breeding birds in North America, and thus is vulnerable to changing conditions and temperatures. Photo: Donna Pomeroy
Ashy Storm-Petrel is one of the most range-restricted breeding birds in North America, and thus is vulnerable to changing conditions and temperatures. Photo: Donna Pomeroy

What are the most vulnerable birds in San Mateo county? What species deserve extra attention as climate change proceeds apace? What can concerned humans do to protect birds and their habitats? This roundtable of local conservationists will address these issues and tell us how best to direct our energies to make a real difference locally.

April 11, 2019
A Naturalist’s Guide to the Olympic Peninsula
Speakers: Ken and Mary Campbell

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Hairy Woodpecker with arachnid prey, Olympic Peninsula, Washington; photo Ken and Mary Campbell
Hairy Woodpecker with arachnid prey, Olympic Peninsula, Washington; photo Ken and Mary Campbell

Take a photographic tour of Washington's Olympic Peninsula with Ken & Mary Campbell to see and learn about some of the best places to view the amazing diversity of habitats and wildlife. The Olympic Peninsula has two National Wildlife Refuges, a National Marine Sanctuary, a National Forest, and a National Park. With nearly 3,600 square-miles to explore, the Peninsula has glacier-covered mountains, magnificent old-growth forests, temperate rain forests, alpine meadows, high alpine lakes, free-flowing salmon rivers, beautiful waterfalls, miles of rugged undeveloped coastline, and the biologically diverse Strait of Juan de Fuca. Though the area is known for its precipitation with the west side receiving nearly 200 inches per year, the area in the rain shadow on the east side receives less than 20 inches. The variety of ecosystems and diverse climates create an environment that is home to a unique mix of flora and fauna.


note The programs for additional meetings will be posted when available. (Topics subject to change.)

2019 S.A.S.